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Saturday, November 7, 2009

Mindful Mornings


In the Jewish faith, the Bible states that we are to make the Sabbath a special, holy and unique day. Part of that uniqueness is the command to refrain from "work" during the 25-hours of the Sabbath. The words used in the Bible which are translated into English as "work" are the Hebrew words kol–m'law·khaw meaning "all and any kind of creative 'generative' endeavor, changes to the environment or any object". It should be kept in mind that the main command concerning the Sabbath says to make it "holy." This means that we are to separate and dedicate the entire day to G-d and the study of His holy Torah. Many Jews interpret the Sabbath in their own, meaningful ways. For instance, some may decide to refrain from using the computer and phone on the Sabbath, others may spend the day reading for pleasure. I try to be particularly mindful on the Sabbath, reflecting on the week past and the week to come. I try to refrain from phone and computer usage and spend as much time with my close family and friends as the day allows. This day is special and sacred to me, as I separate it from the rest of the hectic week-- I slow down, I'm mindful. I believe, whether you follow the Jewish faith or not, that everyone should have their day of reflection and dedication to themselves and to their God or spirituality. My challenge for you all is to make one day of the week different from the rest. How will you do this for yourself?


(Please bare with the 'cheesiness' of the following analogy)
See full size image
This morning I spent time in the front yard, raking the delicately fallen leaves from the trees that surround our house. I was aware and mindful of the rake I held in my hands and the motions I made, gently brushing the leaves aside. I thought of my physical body as the tree and each leaf as an opportunity and chance I was or could have been presented with. Each fallen leaf represented the something I missed out on, passed up on or took for granted because of ED. One leaf  that lay on the ground was a relationship. Another was a research opportunity I was expected to start this fall. The pile of leaves seemed endless, and the more I raked, the more frustrated I became-- until a tear was brought to my eye. I thought, 'really, Rebecca? You're crying over leaves?' Yes, I was. Because when I looked at the tree, it was nearly bare. There was no way to reattach the leaves that had already fallen. They were long gone. Thus, I have to wait for new leaves-- new opportunities and chances to grow and replenish the nakedness of the tree. As I continued to rake, I discovered my purpose in it all. I was cleaning up the mess I had made. The rake symbolized the mental work I have spent so much time and energy processing. And just like the draining energy recovery has taken, I was tired by the time I completed raking the leaves. 
My goal for today is to continue to be mindful and appreciative of the opportunities that have passed, and the chances that have yet to present itself-- Do I really want to clean up another mess of a pile? Is it worth it to allow my life to fall apart leaf by leaf?
I thought this picture was ironic because it represents the energy I could have put towards 
my passion for music.
© Rex Lisman-8061 on Flickr - Photo Sharing!


Sending Saturday Smiles Your Way...

5 comments:

  1. i am going to accept your "challenge" to allow for a day of reflection, i've never been particularly religious, but i think saturday is a good day. today shall be a mindful day and i plan to enjoy it.
    i like the leaves analogy, i sometimes find myself tearing up over similar things but i think it helps motivate recovery, and overall self awareness.
    happy saturday dear :)

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  2. happy shabbat :) it is so important to relax and reflect.

    xoxo
    shelley

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  3. i think it's important for you to relax and reflect; it def helps clear your mind!

    and i love the piano picture. :) gorgeous.

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  4. I will accept your challenge Rebecca! I am actually Jewish myself and surprisingly, I have never thought of the sabbath as a day to reflect. weird huh? I used to go to temple and everything. I guess I just never really understood it.
    and your leaves analogy was NOT cheesy -- I loved it! Such an amazing way to explain how you were feeling.
    We are very much alike my dear :] I love music as well. I play piano and violin. You?
    This post was amazing. Hope you have a lovely Sunday since it is no longer Saturday! :] <3

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  5. This is a very beautiful post! Thank you for sharing ;)

    I just love coming back to your blog!

    Happy Sunday Doll ;)

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